Save West Berkeley Shellmound
with Corrina Gould, Chochenyo Ohlone Leader
Protect Indigenous Lands:
Save West Berkeley Shellmound
Tuesday, February 6th​, 2018
North Berkeley (RSVP for location)
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6:30pm-7:00pm - Casual Potluck
7:00pm-8:30pm - Program
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Free, RSVP Required

Join Ohlone leader Corrina Gould for an evening of discussion about the future of the West Berkeley Shellmound site. This important sacred site is the oldest Ohlone village around the shores of San Francisco Bay.  Strawberry Creek once flowed right through this land. Where the creek met the Bay, Corrina's ancestors started the first village around San Francisco Bay roughly 5,700 years ago. A massive shellmound grew around it and was a center for ritual burials and ceremony. Ohlone ceremony continues at the village site to this day. This is the very first place along the Bay Shores that Ohlone people lived and made their home. This site is older than the pyramids in Egypt and it is older than Jerusalem. 

 

A developer has proposed a 5-story condominium retail complex on the 2.2 acre site (at 1900 4th St.) that is Spenger's parking lot. A decision on the development proposal is expected in the coming months. Corrina is spreading the word about the cultural history of this important site and seeking community support to protect this Berkeley City Landmark, eligible for the National Register of Historic Places, and restore it as an environmental, educational and ceremonial space. 

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Chochenyo Ohlone leader Corrina Gould is the spokesperson for the Confederated Villages of Lisjan and the Co-Founder and a Lead Organizer for Indian People Organizing for Change. She has worked tirelessly to protect the 425 shellmounds that ring San Francisco Bay, and is currently focused on protecting the West Berkeley Shellmound, the first and oldest Ohlone settlement on the Bay.

Hosts:
Elizabeth (Lisa ) Ferguson, Ph.D., Climate Compassion

Elizabeth is a facilitator and educator in the practices of resilience and wellbeing. Combining the wisdom of psychology, contemplative science, internal martial arts and neuroscience, she offers an approach to flourishing that weaves self-compassion, social justice, and community building. 

© 2018  Elizabeth Ferguson/Climate Compassion